Christmas Eve Service w/ Holy Communion & Candle Lighting 

December 24, 2019 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm (S)

Christmas Eve Service w/ Holy Communion & Candle Lighting 

December 24, 2019 @ 4:30 pm5:30 pm (S)

*REMINDER*
ADVENT SERVICE – DECEMBER 4th 
 
We will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a soup and sandwich supper in the fellowship hall; then at 7:00 p.m. we will worship together in the Sanctuary.  We will be using the Holden Evening Prayer Service.  The groups who will host our meal this week are Fellowship, Worship, WELCA and Youth.
 
Please plan to join us!
*REMINDER*
ADVENT SERVICE – DECEMBER 4th 
 
We will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a soup and sandwich supper in the fellowship hall; then at 7:00 p.m. we will worship together in the Sanctuary.  We will be using the Holden Evening Prayer Service.  The groups who will host our meal this week are Fellowship, Worship, WELCA and Youth.
 
Please plan to join us!
*REMINDER*
ADVENT SERVICE – DECEMBER 4th 
 
We will begin at 6:00 p.m. with a soup and sandwich supper in the fellowship hall; then at 7:00 p.m. we will worship together in the Sanctuary.  We will be using the Holden Evening Prayer Service.  The groups who will host our meal this week are Fellowship, Worship, WELCA and Youth.
 
Please plan to join us!

I have been thinking lately …

… about prayer.

Too often we act as if prayer is a magic act. We say the right words, and – poof! – we get what we want. Hocus pocus — we are healed! Abracadabra — we find a job!

Or we act like it is a grocery list that we present to God and have God check off the items gotten for us.

But when we treat prayer as some sort of transactional process, problems arise. Why are some people healed and others are not? Why do some people find a job right away and others do not?

If you respond that it is a matter of how much faith you have, then how do you determine the appropriate dose of faith needed? Did not Jesus say something about having faith the size of a mustard seed?

If you respond that it is a matter of “God’s will,” then why would we pray in the first place if God is going to indiscriminately determine who is going to get their request and who is not?

What these questions reveal is that we have confused the meaning of prayer.

Prayer is not about our requests to God.

Prayer is about our relationship with God.

Prayer is about placing ourselves and others into the presence of God. Prayer is about opening ourselves up to the faith and grace and love and peace that God surrounds us with.

And sometimes when we open ourselves up to the flow of God, things happen. So much that happens in our lives – whether it be illness or bad relationships or a bad work environment – happens because of negativity. When we open ourselves up to the grace and love of God, we dispel those unhealthy forces. Healing happens. Wholeness happens. Transformation happens.

But sometimes, sickness is just sickness; job loss is just job loss; failed relationships are just failed relationships; death is just death. That does not mean that we discount prayer. If anything, we rely even more on that relationship which is prayer. We rely even more on the God who goes with us and sustains us through illness, through being fired, through divorce, through death.

As an example of this, I love the story of Jacob’s struggle with the angel or man of God or God in Genesis 32.

Jacob was in a period of acute crisis. He was preparing the next morning to face his brother Esau for the first time in more than 20 years, a brother who had vowed to kill Jacob because Jacob had stolen his birthright and blessing. Jacob did not know what would happen. Would Esau welcome him? Or would Esau kill him?

So, in the middle of the night, Jacob struggles with an unknown man, perhaps representing a wrestling with his fears or his guilt or his past. As he does so, Jacob does not let the man go, saying to him, “I will not let you go, unless you bless me.” (Genesis 32:26). The man leaves Jacob with a limp but also renames him in the process.

The power in this story is the promise that as we struggle with ourselves – especially as we struggle openly before God – blessing can and will come.

I often picture myself as Jacob, struggling to find blessing in many different circumstances. When I struggle with life’s meaning – especially in light of illness, death, or despair – this story represents my prayerful struggle before God: “I will not let you go, unless you bless me.”

When I struggle with my own past, my own fears, my own guilt, this story represents my wrestling with God and with myself: “I will not let you go, unless you bless me.”

For if we are struggling and wrestling with God, at least we are still in a relationship with God. When God renames Jacob as a consequence — calling him Israel, “The one who contends” — God affirms that the presence of God and our own meaning is found in the struggle.

And that is what prayer is all about: being in relationship with God, contending and struggling with God, all to remind ourselves that the grace and love and peace of God are for us.

A seminary professor would say to all of us when leaving, “Strength for the struggle.”

As the true meaning for prayer, we claim that for ourselves:

Strength for the struggle.

The Memorial Service for Carol Lanier will be at Epiphany Lutheran Church on Saturday, October 5th at 1:00 PM.  A reception for family and friends will follow the service. Our condolences and prayers go to Michael Lanier and family as they grieve the loss of their loved one.

September 7, 2019

By Pastor David Armstrong-Reiner

 

In one sense, it was a tennis match like any other tennis match.

In another sense, it was a tennis match that took on a life of its own even before it had started.

Coco Gauff at 15 years old had captured the hearts and imaginations of the United States. She had made it to the fourth round at Wimbledon. And now she was in the third round at the U.S. Open, facing the number one seed in the world, Naomi Osaka, a veteran at 21. You could hear and feel the excitement in the stadium.

Life has a way of painting a different picture than we might expect or desire. Osaka beat Gauff in straight sets: 6-3, 6-0. After all, Naomi is presently considered the best in the world, and she played as if she was.

But the story did not end there.

With Coco in tears at the end of the match, Naomi went up to her, hugged her, and had her come to the post-match microphone with her. As Naomi tells the story, she knew that the crowd had come to see Coco. And though Naomi knew that Coco was hurting with the loss, she wanted Coco to address the fans, feel their support, and know that she had done well.

It was perhaps the most incredible show of sportsmanship that I have seen in a long time.

We live in a world in which we are trained to see the negativity, the division, the despair. Yet, examples of hope and love and unity surround us all the time if we but take the time to look.

Paul tells the Philippians: “Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility regard others as better than yourselves. Let each of you look not to your own interests, but to the interests of others. Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 2:3-5)

In that post-match interview, Naomi Osaka exemplified what humility is all about. She showed what it means to have the same mind that was in Christ Jesus.

In so doing, she encourages me to look for those examples of humility and kindness as I move through my day. She encourages me to shower others with random acts of kindness, reach out to those who are hurting, to be the face of Jesus to those I meet.

And when we look for those examples of love, when we become those examples of love, be ready for what can happen to our lives. Be ready for what can happen to our world.

It might all just start with a tennis match that shows us all how to be with one another.

All children in Pre-K4 & Kindergarten participate during the service.
Leaders take the children to chapel following
the children’s sermon and return for communion.

If you are available to volunteer for Children’s Chapel
please contact Riki DeLamar at 678-314-7807 or email her at cakes_and_catering@yahoo.com

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